VerbAbout VerbsAction VerbsCausative VerbsContractionsDo and MakeFinite and Nonfinite VerbsGerundInfinitive FormInversionLinking VerbsModal VerbsMay and MightMoodsPhrasal VerbsSay and TellShallStative VerbsThird Person SingularUsed toRegular VerbsIrregular VerbsVerb FormsCompound Verbs
ConditionalConditionalZero ConditionalFirst ConditionalSecond ConditionalThird ConditionalMixed ConditionalInversion in Conditional Sentences
Passive VoicePassive VoicePresent Simple PassivePresent Continuous PassivePast Simple PassivePast Continuous PassivePerfect Tenses PassiveFuture Simple PassiveGoing to PassiveSay / Believe / SupposeGet + Participle
Adverbs of FrequencyAdverbs of FrequencyAdverbs of Frequency - Position in Sentence
QuestionsQuestion TagsRhetorical QuestionsEcho Questions
Reported SpeechReported SpeechModals in Reported SpeechReported Commands and RequestsReported QuestionsPresent Perfect in Reported SpeechFuture Perfect in Reported Speech
Irregular VerbsIrregular Verbs - GroupsIrregular Verbs - Forms
ParticiplesPresent ParticiplePast ParticiplePerfect Participle
Other TopicsWill vs. Going toIf / Even if / Whether / Unless If + Were or If + WasAs If / As Though + Past SubjunctiveHabits Expressed by Will and WouldHad BetterSubject
Read MoreAuxiliary VerbsAuxiliary Verbs: To BeAuxiliary Verbs: To HaveAuxiliary Verbs: To DoWhen To Use the Verb To Be
Grammar

Gerund

The gerund is the -ing form of the verb when it is used as a noun.

For example, the word driving is a gerund in this sentence:

  • Driving a car is not easy at all!

But it is not in this sentence:

  • Look! He's driving and talking on the phone.

In the above sentence driving is a present participleand the whole sentence is in the present continuous.

Use

I. After prepositions

We use gerunds when the verb is immediately after prepositions, e.g. of, against, after, for, in, about, etc.

  • I'm thinking of going to Hawaii.
  • There’s no point in repairing the phone if you plan to buy a new one.
  • We have nothing against coming later.

II. As subject after nouns and adjectives

We use gerunds when we are talking about an action or activity in a general way.

a) with nouns, e.g. thought, hope, idea, principle, difficulty:

  • The thought of losing weight
  • The hope of getting a new job
  • The idea of beeing famous

b) with adjectives, e.g. tired of, fond of, angry at, etc.:

  • Tired of playing computer games
  • Angry at having to be fired
  • Not very fond of jogging

The List of Most Important Verbs Connected with Gerunds

admit, appreciate, avoid, complete, consider, delay, deny, discuss, dislike, enjoy, finish, give up, can’t help, insist on, keep (on), look forward to, mind, miss, object to, practice, prefer, recall, recommend, risk, suggest, (get) used to, understand

Examples:

  • She should consider changing her profession.
  • I look forward to meeting you soon.
  • Keep smiling! Everything will be fine.
  • We will object to being paid later.
  • I`m afraid I can’t recall reading any such exciting article.
VerbAbout VerbsAction VerbsCausative VerbsContractionsDo and MakeFinite and Nonfinite VerbsGerundInfinitive FormInversionLinking VerbsModal VerbsMay and MightMoodsPhrasal VerbsSay and TellShallStative VerbsThird Person SingularUsed toRegular VerbsIrregular VerbsVerb FormsCompound Verbs
ConditionalConditionalZero ConditionalFirst ConditionalSecond ConditionalThird ConditionalMixed ConditionalInversion in Conditional Sentences
Passive VoicePassive VoicePresent Simple PassivePresent Continuous PassivePast Simple PassivePast Continuous PassivePerfect Tenses PassiveFuture Simple PassiveGoing to PassiveSay / Believe / SupposeGet + Participle
Adverbs of FrequencyAdverbs of FrequencyAdverbs of Frequency - Position in Sentence
QuestionsQuestion TagsRhetorical QuestionsEcho Questions
Reported SpeechReported SpeechModals in Reported SpeechReported Commands and RequestsReported QuestionsPresent Perfect in Reported SpeechFuture Perfect in Reported Speech
Irregular VerbsIrregular Verbs - GroupsIrregular Verbs - Forms
ParticiplesPresent ParticiplePast ParticiplePerfect Participle
Other TopicsWill vs. Going toIf / Even if / Whether / Unless If + Were or If + WasAs If / As Though + Past SubjunctiveHabits Expressed by Will and WouldHad BetterSubject
Read MoreAuxiliary VerbsAuxiliary Verbs: To BeAuxiliary Verbs: To HaveAuxiliary Verbs: To DoWhen To Use the Verb To Be